June, 2016

May, 2016

April, 2016

  • The six rules of barbecuing

    28 April, 2016 The six rules of barbecuing

    Even the best cooks can be stumped when it comes to cooking to perfection over coals. We ask Ben Tish to tell us the six most important rules of barbecuing so we can grill with confidence over the long weekend.
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November, 2015

October, 2015

September, 2015

August, 2015

July, 2015

  • Eat like an Italian

    20 July, 2015 Eat like an Italian

    If you’ve ever been on holiday to Italy, like us, you’ve probably eaten classic pizzas, pastas and risottos until you’re fit to burst. While sticking with what you know isn’t always a bad thing, delve a little deeper and you’ll find the true heart of the region; eating cotoletta in Milan, beans in Florence and artichokes in Campania will open up a whole new world of Italian cooking. We spoke to three Air B’n’B hosts about the food of their region, must-eats while you’re there, and asked about the best-kept secrets when it comes to eating out.
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  • Michelin Stars in Your Eyes

    06 July, 2015 Michelin Stars in Your Eyes

    With so many Michelin-starred chefs on the site, we challenged Cooked writer Imogen Corke to test her mettle on some of the trickier recipes. This week, she cooks Atul Kochhar’s cod in nilgiri korma gravy from his latest cookbook, Benares.
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May, 2015

  • Q&A with Rosie Birkett

    22 May, 2015 Q&A with Rosie Birkett

    We ask our authors ten questions about their life long love of food. This week, we speak to Rosie Birkett, author of A Lot on her Plate, about roast dinners, tuna tacos, and why you should never run your finger through hot caramel.
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  • The Lunchbox Edit: Spring Greens

    01 May, 2015 The Lunchbox Edit: Spring Greens

    Each week, we take some of our favourite recipes and give them a little tweak to make perfect packed lunches.
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East-meets-west diner food

By
Added
10 October, 2017

Jeremy Pang shares a snapshot of Hong Kong’s street food and diner culture in his new book. Rest assured though, it’s an easy cooking style to recreate at home. Grab your wok and dive in!

Let Jeremy set the scene: If you’ve ever watched a Hong Kong gangster movie, you’ll know what a dai pai dong is, even if you’ve never been to Hong Kong. At the start of the movie, once the cameras have finished panning across the bird’s eye view of the skyscrapers and twinkling harbours, the real action begins, most often in the middle of a crowded street market. Once they hit the market scene there is likely to be a token shot of some guy in a sweat-stained white tank top, wielding a giant cleaver or whisking a featherweight wok. That is a dai pai dong. It’s a type of street food eating establishment that has been around in Hong Kong since the 1800s. This is the place to come for the most street level, sink-or-swim experience if you want the most authentic lesson in Cantonese cooking.

Hong Kong’s cuisine draws on everything from classic Chinese to America’s west coast to French Vietnamese. It’s a city where apartment sizes are likened to the size of large parking spaces, where space is limited, and home kitchens are often a secondary thought, or else there would be nowhere to sleep.  

As a result, cooks and chefs in Hong Kong have to be super-efficient. Not just with their kitchen space, but also the way they prepare and serve their food. This can be seen all over Hong Kong, from the aforementioned street-food stalls, to the smartest restaurants. Luckily for us, Jeremy has devised a clever system for wok cooking, that once you’ve tried it for Chinese food, you may well end up using it for all your cooking.


The Wok clock

When it comes to learning how to cook Chinese cuisine, Jeremy has one top tip: prepare your ingredients in an organized manner, using a round clock as a plate. He calls this the Wok Clock and it works like this;

Prepare your ingredients and then place them in their cooking order, beginning at 12 o’clock, working your way around a plate. Whether you are cooking a stir-fry or a slow-cooked curry, it works.

Start with the base ingredients (onion, garlic, ginger), and firmer vegetables, then move on to the meats or other proteins, followed by the sauce or braising liquid. It’s that simple.


OUR PICK OF JEREMY'S BOOK

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