Four reasons to try haggis on Burns Night

By
Eve O'Sullivan
Added
21 January, 2016

James Macsween, MD and Director of Innovation at pioneering haggis producers Macsween, wants to bust the myths around Scotland’s national dish. Here are the four most common misconceptions, and the truth behind them.




Haggis is only eaten in Scotland.

Thanks to Scottish writer Robert Burns and his famous verse, ‘Address to a Haggis’, one of the biggest myth surrounding haggis is that it belongs to Scotland alone. It’s actually a very ancient dish with roots in many cultures across the globe – it was traditionally made using a variety of wild animals depending on what was being hunted.


Haggis is unhealthy.

One misconception is that haggis is unhealthy or fattening. With a nutritional profile similar to a lamb chop or a chicken leg, it is a great source of iron, fibre and carbohydrates, which can be beneficial when eaten as part of a well-balanced diet.


Haggis can only be eaten on Burns Night with a dram of whisky and a side of ‘neeps n’ tatties’. 

Nothing could be further from the truth. The gentle mix of spices means haggis pairs perfectly with flavours from a variety of different cuisines, including Italian and Mexican.


There’s only one right way of making haggis.

The list of ingredients claimed to be included in haggis is endless, but only the finest lamb and beef makes it into our family recipe.

http://www.macsween.co.uk/


    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again