Liquid greens

Liquid greens

By
Zita Steyn
Contains
10 recipes
Published by
Quadrille Publishing
ISBN
9781849497169

Juices/smoothies

Aim to use more vegetables than fruit when preparing fresh juices. Make this shift gradually if you are new to juicing.

Freshly pressed vegetable juices are a useful way of increasing nutrient intake, especially in those with digestive problems or other health issues.

Freshly juiced tonics should be consumed as soon as possible after making, as exposure to light and oxygen starts degrading the juice at once.

Buy produce that’s been minimally sprayed with pesticides, as you are using the whole fruit or veg.

Vegetable juices should be seen as a nutrient supplement under normal circumstances and not as a meal replacement unless you are following a juice-based detox for a few days. Smoothies, on the other hand, are akin to a (liquid) meal, so bear this in mind when you have a large smoothie and feel entitled to a fry-up, too!

To increase nutrient absorption:

Drink green juices on an empty stomach or two hours after having eaten, and wait at least 20 minutes before eating your next meal

Consume some fat with juices and smoothies (liquid coconut oil, nuts or nut butters and seeds)

Drink juices and smoothies at room temperature – it is kinder on your digestion

Always include a vitamin C-rich food (such as lemon or lime) in your green juice and smoothie, or have some soon after, as this helps reduce the effect of the oxalic acid or anti-nutrients found in many leafy greens (such as spinach and chard)

Alternate greens frequently. Regular consumption of raw cruciferous vegetables, for example, may affect those with thyroid dysfunction due to the goitrogens.

Always start juicing with the leafy greens and herbs, followed by the soft fruits and ginger, and lastly any chunky produce such as apple, carrot, celery or cucumber, to help the juicer do its job.

Chew your drinks and drink your food! If you don’t swirl the drink around in your mouth and chew a few times, the digestive process, which starts with saliva production in the mouth and a signal being sent to the brain to release digestive juices in the stomach, is compromised.

Recipes in this Chapter

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