Simple ways to bypass sugar

Simple ways to bypass sugar

By
Sue Quinn
Contains
0 recipes
Published by
Hardie Grant Books
ISBN
9781784880422
Photographer
Victoria Wall Harris

Sugar is such a large part of our everyday diet that often we don’t even realise we're consuming it. By paying attention to the sugar content of what we eat, and making simple dietary adjustments, it's easy to dramatically reduce our intake.

fizzy drinks & fruit juice

JUMP the SUGAR

milk, water, vegetable juice, diluted fruit juice

Start by cutting out or reducing intake of sugary beverages, especially fizzy drinks and fruit juice, which are the most damaging ways to consume sugar. Drink milk, water, vegetable juice or diluted fruit juice instead. Try gradually reducing sugar in hot beverages until you don’t add any.

when baking

JUMP the SUGAR

reduce sugar in recipes

When baking, reduce quantities of sugar in recipes by one-third to one-half. Make puddings, cakes and biscuits a treat rather than part of your everyday diet.

buying food & drink

JUMP the SUGAR

read the labels

Research the total sugar (especially fructose) content of the food and drink you consume – quantities vary significantly between brands. Read labels carefully.

processed food

JUMP the SUGAR

cook from scratch

Avoid processed food, which is loaded with added sugar, and cook more from scratch, especially sauces, dressings and breakfast cereals. Shop in the outer aisles of the supermarket where fresh produce is generally sold.

low-fat products

JUMP the SUGAR

buy full-fat versions

Avoid low-fat products – manufacturers load these with added sugar to make them palatable. Instead of fruit-flavoured yoghurt, for example, buy plain yoghurt and swirl through fruit puree.

sugary snacks

JUMP the SUGAR

choose unsweetened snacks

Eat lots of small meals, as many as six a day, to reduce the temptation to snack on sugary food. Identify your weaknesses and find unsweetened substitutes. For example, if you like sweet biscuits with your coffee, keep nuts or sugar-free crackers by the kettle.

eating fruit

JUMP the SUGAR

low-sugar fruit

Fresh fruit is a healthy choice, but contains lots of sugar, especially fructose, so enjoy in moderation and go for the less sugary kinds. The adjacent list includes fruit with less than 10g sugar per 100g, from lowest to highest. Choose cans of fruit in unsweetened juice rather than syrup.

Fruit

with less than 10g sugar per 100g:

raspberries

blackberries

strawberries

watermelon

currants

papayas

cantaloupe melons

nectarines

mulberries

honeydew melons

tangerines

pineapples

peaches

sour cherries

guavas

kiwi fruit

apricots

oranges

apples

pears

blueberries

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