St Louis-style spare ribs

St Louis-style spare ribs

By
From
The Hang Fire Cookbook
Serves
8

This wouldn’t be a book about barbecue if we didn’t include a rib recipe or two, right? And frankly, if we sold nothing else at our HF pop-ups but pork spares, we’d make a lot of people happy! People cannot get enough of meat that comes with its own handle. And it seems to span generations. We’ve seen grandmas with their grandkids perched on their knee, both tucking into a pile of ribs as quickly as each other. They’re a crowd-pleaser for sure.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
4 whole racks of pork spare ribs, about 1.2kg each
160ml olive oil or american mustard
12 tablespoons Hang Fire almost all-purpose rub
300g Hang Fire smokehouse barbecue sauce, warmed
50g unsalted butter

For the Basting Mixture

Quantity Ingredient
200ml fresh apple juice
200ml cider vinegar

Method

  1. Trim your ribs St Louis-style, by cutting the sides and top off each rack to create a rough rectangular shape. Remove the rib membrane from the back of the ribs and drizzle 1 tablespoon of oil or a squirt of American mustard on each side of the ribs and rub in. Dust the rub onto the surface and underneath on the bone side of the ribs, coating the edges, too. Be careful not to rub it into the meat too vigorously otherwise you’ll clog the pores we need open to absorb smoke. Pop in the fridge for 1 hour.
  2. Set up your grill for indirect heat and maintain a consistent temperature around 108°C. Add your wood and when it’s smoking, place your ribs in the smoker, with the curve of the bone facing down. (If you’re using a rib rack see recipe note.) You’re looking at a 6-hour smoke time.
  3. After 3 hours, a decent bark should have formed and you can wrap the ribs up in individual foil boats. Place a rack of ribs in the centre of two sheets of foil large enough to wrap over the top (the double layer preventing the bones from poking through). Make a little lip all round, turning the foil up at the edges. Mix together the basting ingredients, wrap each individual rib in a foil boat and pour 100ml into each packet. Wrap up and crimp the edges, making sure the foil is tightly wrapped around the rib. Return to the smoker and let them cook for about 2 hours.
  4. After 2 hours, take the ribs out of the foil packets, discard the foil and the liquid, and return the ribs to the smoker for another hour. You should notice that the steaming stage has tenderised the meat and caused it to shrink back from the bones. The end bones should show through nicely – that’s exactly what you want. The bark should have now reformed too and at the 5 hour mark, it’s time to glaze these beauties.
  5. In a saucepan, warm your Hang Fire Smokehouse Barbecue Sauce with the butter, mixing over low heat until the butter has melted. Don’t let the sauce boil or bubble, simply warm through gently. Before you get glazing, test the ribs for doneness. Just after the 5-hour mark, pick them up with your tongs and do the ‘bend test’. If the ribs do not crack at the ends when you pick them up with tongs, they need a little longer (you’re looking at 90°C on your instant-read thermometer). At the 5 hour 15 minute mark, liberally paint the ribs all over with the warmed sauce, close the lid of the grill and let the glaze set for 15 minutes. Repeat again for the final 15 minutes of the cook.
  6. When the ribs come out of the smoker, give them a liberal brushing with the remaining sauce. Let them rest for 10 minutes, then carve evenly between the bones to serve.

Cooking methods

  • Indirect Grilling/Smoking

Wood

  • Hickory, Oak

On using rib racks

  • When using rib racks, we like to leave one space empty between the slabs so that the smoke and heat can flow evenly over the surfaces. If you don’t have the luxury of space, make sure the ribs aren’t touching each other – the slabs will take far longer to smoke. Remove the ribs from the rib rack and lay them on top of each other in a large roasting tray. Pour in 200ml of the apple juice and cider vinegar mix then cover tightly with foil. Smoke for 2 hours, then remove and put them carefully back into the rib rack with the newly exposed bones facing upwards. Unfortunately you may have to skip the glazing stage as it’s pretty tricky to do for racks. You can, however, spritz them lightly with the basting mixture every 20 minutes starting at the 5 hour mark to help produce a good bark.
Tags:
barbecue
BBQ
Southern
America
Deep South
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again