Dressed raw fish

Dressed raw fish

Lap pa

By
From
South East Asian Food

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
3 tablespoons glutinous rice
2 slices galangal, seared under a griller until dry and then finely chopped
800g very fresh fish fillets
1 1/2 limes, juiced
2-3 tablespoons country fish paste water
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon dried chilli powder or flakes
3 shallots, finely chopped
or 1/2 big red onion, finely chopped
1 cup round-leaf mint, chopped
1/2 cup chopped coriander leaf
1/2 cup chopped spring onion
4 fresh chillies, sliced diagonally

Method

  1. First prepare the rice by roasting it until brown in a dry pan and then grinding it with the galangal to a consistency of fine sand. Set aside. Ground rice that has been prepared in this way will keep in an airtight jar for up to a month.
  2. Skin the fish fillets. Keep the skin if you wish and slice the fillets into very fine strips. Squeeze the lime juice over the pieces, mix together thoroughly and leave to stand for 20 minutes. If you plan to use the fish skin, make stock from fish heads, dip the skin in as it boils then remove and cut it into small slices. Reserve the stock for tom yam or other soup.
  3. After 20 minutes squeeze the juice out of the marinated fish by hand, retaining the juice and leaving the fish dry. Put the juice in a saucepan, add the country fish paste water and the fish sauce and stir together. Bring the mixture to the boil then take off the stove and allow to cool until warm.
  4. Pour the sauce over the fish meat and mix, adding the fish skin (if used), dried chilli and shallots and mix again. Now mix in the ground rice. Taste and adjust seasonings, adding more fish sauce, lime juice or country fish paste water if necessary. Finally, mix in the herbs and garnish with diagonal slices of fresh chilli.
  5. Lap is served accompanied by cucumber slices or strips, whole green beans topped and tailed; raw golf-ball eggplant, cut vertically one-third of the way down then turned 90 degrees and cut down again and soaked in cold water; some dill; and, in Laos, a red slightly bitter leaf called phak kadau (neem tree; Azadirachta indica) and another fine inflorescence called phak samek. Bitter green endive and radicchio leaves or witloof would be possible substitutes for these. Eat with sticky rice.
Tags:
SBS
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