Beef or lamb saté with peanut sauce

Beef or lamb saté with peanut sauce

Ratami’s saté

By
From
South East Asian Food

Saté on skewers is quintessential street food in Indonesia, and also features as a ritual food at Balinese temple festivals. Cooked on carefully tended charcoal stoves, the fires brought to just the right temperature through vigorous fanning, saté is perfect food to serve at outdoor barbecues. To be really authentic it should be accompanied by pieces of rice cake (Ketupat or Nasi Impit), cut into chunks, and a cucumber pickle (Acar Mentimun), but it would do just as well to provide a tossed salad and perhaps a bowl of steamed rice. Always remember to soak the saté sticks in water for an hour or two beforehand to prevent them from burning on the fire.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
500g grilling steak or boned leg of lamb
fried onion flakes, for garnish
a squeeze lime juice

Marinade

Quantity Ingredient
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 garlic cloves, smashed and chopped
2 shallots, chopped
2 teaspoons brown sugar
3 teaspoons lime juice
1 tablespoon tamarind water
2 tablespoons dark soya sauce

Ratami’s peanut sauce

Quantity Ingredient
4 red chillies
4 shallots, sliced
oil, for frying
125g raw peanuts, freshly fried, skins removed, roughly ground
1 cup all-purpose coconut milk
palm sugar or brown sugar, to taste
1 stalk lemongrass, bruised
1 salam leaf
salt
pepper

Method

  1. Combine all the ingredients to make the marinade. Cut the meat into 1.5 cm cubes and soak in the marinade for at least 30 minutes. Thread the cubes on saté sticks to about one-third of their length and grill them, basting with what is left of the marinade. The grilling is best done over a charcoal fire or a low barbecue fire, though a gas or electric grill or even a griddle on top of the stove is acceptable. Try using a thick stalk of lemongrass crushed at the bottom as a basting brush: it will not disintegrate in the heat as a nylon brush might.
  2. To make the sauce, grind the chillies and shallots to a paste. Heat a little oil and fry it lightly. Put all the other ingredients into the pan, mix well and bring to the boil. Simmer gently until cooked, stirring all the time. Add water if the sauce is too thick.
  3. Crunchy peanut butter is sometimes used in peanut sauces instead of roasting and grinding peanuts yourself. This is a very poor substitute for roughly crushed fresh peanuts. The extra trouble of preparing raw peanuts is well worthwhile.
  4. Place the satés (skewers and all) on a large heated plate and spoon peanut sauce over them. Garnish with fried onion flakes, finish with a squeeze of lime juice and serve.
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