Lemon rice

Lemon rice

By
From
Spice Kitchen
Serves
4
Photographer
Jana Liebenstein

Rice recipes that use already-cooked rice are popular in South India, and lemon rice is considered a delicacy there. It is a lovely way to use up left-over rice. If freshly cooked, the rice should be at room temperature – stirring the hot tempering through it will heat it up. You can serve it hot on a banana leaf with an assortment of curries or just with yoghurt and pickle. It is also great as a warm or cold salad.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
1 tablespoon split white lentils, washed and drained
1 teaspoon turmeric
225g basmati rice or other long-grain rice, cooked, at room temperature (see notes)
2 lemons, juiced
2 tablespoons vegetable or canola oil
30g raw cashew nuts
30g raw peanuts
1/2-1 teaspoon salt, or to taste

Tempering

Quantity Ingredient
20 curry leaves
1/2 teaspoon black mustard seeds
pinch asafoetida
1 tablespoon split yellow peas, washed and drained
2 red chillies

Method

  1. Heat the fenugreek seeds and split white lentils in a heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat for 1 minute. Allow to cool, then grind finely with the turmeric using a mortar and pestle or an electric spice grinder.
  2. Put the cooked rice in a large bowl and stir through the ground spices and split white lentils and the lemon juice.
  3. Heat the oil over a medium heat in the frying pan. Cook the cashew nuts and peanuts, stirring continuously, for about 2 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove the nuts from the pan, drain on kitchen towels and set aside.
  4. Using the oil in the frying pan, make the tempering: add the curry leaves, mustard seeds, asafoetida, split yellow peas and chillies to the pan and cook, stirring continuously, for 2 minutes, or until the mixture is brown.
  5. Pour the tempering over the rice, add the salt and stir to mix together thoroughly.
  6. Garnish with the reserved cashew nuts and peanuts and serve.

Notes:

  • In South Indian cooking, a contrast in texture is often provided by adding lentils and pulses to cooked vegetables. They are not necessarily cooked until soft. Instead, as with the split yellow peas in this recipe, they are washed and drained, and then quickly fried in hot oil or ghee for 1–2 minutes. This gives them a crunchy texture, and as they are fully cooked, they are fine to eat.

    You need 100 g of uncooked basmati rice to yield 225 g of cooked rice.
Tags:
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Indian
India
Asia
Asian
Spice Kitchen
Ragini
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