Tempering chocolate

Tempering chocolate

By
From
PS Desserts
Photographer
Mark Roper

Tempering chocolate sounds like a daunting task but it’s all about temperature. When chocolate is heated and melted the fat molecules separate and to reunite them you need to temper the chocolate, which stabilises the molecules and ensures it sets with a wonderful sheen and crack. Chocolate work should be done at room temperature, ideally between 18°C and 24°C. If it is too hot, then the chocolate won’t set; if it’s too cold, then it sets so quickly you won’t have time to work with it. Humidity can cause problems as well. I temper chocolate for dipping, moulding and for the plaques for my Snickers and the Raspberry chocolate délice.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
your choice of best-quality dark couverture, milk or white chocolate

Method

  1. Melting chocolate

    Finely chop or grate the chocolate and melt in a heatproof bowl over a saucepan of barely simmering water. Let more than half of the chocolate melt before you give it a stir with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula.
  2. Remove from the heat and stir until smooth and shiny. The temperature of the chocolate should be 50–55ºC for dark couverture, no more than 50ºC for milk chocolate and no more than 45ºC for white.
  3. Tempering chocolate

    Pour two-thirds of the chocolate onto a cool work surface (marble and stainless steel are the best). Set aside the remaining chocolate and put back on the pan of simmering water off the heat to keep warm.
  4. Using a large step-palette knife or scraper, work the chocolate continuously, bringing it up over itself.
  5. Keep working the chocolate until it begins to thicken and the temperature drops to 26ºC.
  6. Scrape the chocolate off the work surface and return it to the bowl with the remaining warm chocolate.
  7. Stir the chocolate until it reaches 30–32ºC for dark and milk chocolate, and 28–29ºC for white chocolate. The tempered chocolate is now ready to use.

Notes

  • When chopping or grating chocolate, try to get it as fine as possible as it will be much easier to melt and be lump-free.

    Due to the higher sugar and cocoa butter content in milk and white chocolate, they are far more delicate and more likely to be ruined if they get too hot.
Tags:
PS
Desserts
Philippa
Phillipa
Sibley
sweet
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again