Tuscan-style barbecued T-bone with warm sausage and cabbage salad

Tuscan-style barbecued T-bone with warm sausage and cabbage salad

By
From
Botanical
Serves
4
Photographer
William Meppem

When buying T-bone steaks always look for ones with the tenderloin the same thickness as the strip loin. Good butchers will always cut T-bones from yearling beef, which are relatively small cattle. Their short loins – this is where T-bones are cut from – are therefore small, resulting in consistent thickness of both parts of the steak. Dry-ageing adds character and flavour to the beef. The garnish for this dish is influenced by the classic Fiorentina steak, which hails from Tuscany, so it seemed logical to serve it with a salad of cavolo nero. Its young peppery leaves are delicious tossed with shaved fennel and dressed with lentil vinaigrette.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
4 450 g t-bone steaks, preferably grass-fed but finished on grain and dry-aged for 14–21 days
50ml olive oil
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Marinade

Quantity Ingredient
1 bunch rosemary, leaves finely chopped
1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves finely chopped
1 bunch sage, leaves finely chopped
3 garlic cloves
6 anchovy fillets, finely chopped
1 teaspoon sea salt flakes
1 teaspoon coarsely cracked black pepper
250ml extra-virgin olive oil
1 lemon, juiced

Cabbage salad

Quantity Ingredient
3 white onions or shallots, finely sliced and separated into rings
2 small fennel bulbs, sliced into rings
400g young cavolo nero leaves, excess stalks removed
1 quantity Lentil vinaigrette
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Garnish

Quantity Ingredient
1 cotechino sausage, raw or cooked, (see Note)
1 litre Chicken stock
1 quantity Green herb dressing
50ml olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
sea salt flakes
1 lemon, quartered

Method

  1. Ideally, marinate the steaks the day before you wish to serve this dish. To make the marinade, combine the herbs – except for a few rosemary sprigs, to be reserved for cooking the cotechino sausage – with the garlic, anchovies, sea salt flakes and pepper. Bind with extra-virgin olive oil and lemon juice, then rub all over the steaks and refrigerate until required, for at least 24 hours.
  2. If the cotechino sausage is raw, cook it gently in chicken stock, covered with a lid, for several hours and allow to cool in the stock.
  3. Preheat the barbecue. Take the steaks from the refrigerator 20 or so minutes before cooking to allow the meat to reach room temperature and therefore cook evenly. Prepare the lentil vinaigrette and green herb dressing.
  4. When the barbecue is very hot, drizzle the steaks with a little olive oil, season lightly and place on the hottest part of the grill. Char-grill for 2 minutes on each side. Move the steaks so that the tenderloins face away from the barbecue, on the edge of the grill (as otherwise they tend to overcook before the strip loin). Cook for a further 2 minutes if you like your meat medium–rare or longer if you prefer it well done.
  5. While the steaks are cooking, slice the cooked cotechino into 8 pieces. Heat a little olive oil over a high heat and pan-fry the cotechino slices on both sides until crisp. Then add the butter to the pan and the reserved rosemary sprigs for the last minute or so of cooking. Drain on paper towels and lightly season with sea salt flakes. Rest the meat for 5 minutes before serving.
  6. To make the salad, simply combine the onion, fennel and cavolo nero. Dress with the lentil vinaigrette and season at the very last minute because the dressing is very acidic and will break down the salad quickly.
  7. To serve, place the T-bones on individual serving plates, dress the salad then arrange it alongside the steaks. Spoon the green herb sauce all over the meat, top with the slices of cotechino and serve with a lemon quarter on the side.

Chef’s note

  • Cotechino is sold both cooked and raw. Raw cotechino requires long, slow cooking for several hours in a fragrant chicken stock before being allowed to cool. It is then ready to be sliced and shallow-fried. Good Italian delicatessens will sell cotechino cooked while most Italian butchers will sell their own raw version.
Tags:
restaurant
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high end
cuisine
Botanical
complex
challenging
fine dining
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