Lamb shanks marinated in the style of venison with chestnuts, smoked bacon and celeriac

Lamb shanks marinated in the style of venison with chestnuts, smoked bacon and celeriac

By
From
Botanical
Serves
4
Photographer
William Meppem

The technique of marinating in the style of venison is a good way of creating a wonderful gamey flavour when braising or roasting – try roasting a leg of lamb after it has marinated for a few hours. The method is excellent for cooking beef cheeks and other cheaper cuts, and of course great for braising venison. This recipe is also perfect for winter, as a one-pot dish in the centre of the table for your guests to enjoy.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
750ml red wine
4 tablespoons crushed juniper berries
4 cinnamon sticks
1 teaspoon coarsely cracked black pepper
2 bay leaves
10 garlic cloves, smashed
1 carrot, roughly chopped
1 red onion, roughly chopped
4 hindquarter lamb shanks
50ml extra-virgin olive oil
50ml olive oil
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Sauce

Quantity Ingredient
300ml red wine vinegar
600g redcurrant jelly
1 1/2 litres Lamb stock
6 tablespoons cornflour

Garnish

Quantity Ingredient
1 quantity Celeriac purée
200g Peeled chestnuts
200g baby onions, peeled
250ml Chicken stock
1 bunch thyme
1 tablespoon butter
salt and freshly ground black pepper
175ml smoked bacon or kaiserfleisch lardons
1 tablespoon olive oil
300g small brussels sprouts, cooked, or a combination of cooked peas and broad beans

Method

  1. Combine the red wine with the spices and vegetables. Put the lamb shanks in a deep casserole or saucepan and pour the wine mixture over the top, covering the meaty part of the shanks. Drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil and refrigerate for 3–4 hours – but no longer, as the wine will overpower the meat.
  2. While the meat is marinating, make the sauce. Combine the vinegar and redcurrant jelly in a large saucepan. Bring to the boil over a medium heat and reduce by half. Add the lamb stock and reduce by half again. Dissolve the cornflour in a little cold water and whisk into the sauce until it just thickens. Set aside until required.
  3. Preheat oven to 190°C.
  4. Remove the shanks from the marinade. Pass the marinade through a sieve into a saucepan, reserving the vegetables and spices. Bring the marinade liquid to the boil over a medium heat for about 4 minutes, skimming off all impurities that rise to the surface until it becomes a clear sauce.
  5. In a frying pan, heat some olive oil over a high heat and fry the shanks all over until well coloured. Transfer the shanks, bone facing up, to an ovenproof casserole. In the same frying pan, fry the vegetables from the marinade in 2 batches, until well coloured. Add the vegetables to the casserole then cover with the now clear sauce. Put a circle of greaseproof paper the diameter of the casserole on top, with a hole in the middle (this allows air into the braise, thus causing no steam, which would affect the reducing process that gives the braise its flavour).
  6. Bake for 2 hours until the shanks are soft and gelatinous. Remove the shanks from the casserole and keep warm. Pour the cooking juices through a sieve into a saucepan, bring to the boil and simmer over a medium heat until reduced to a rich sauce. Adjust the seasoning to taste.
  7. While the shanks are cooking, prepare the celeriac purée and peeled chestnuts. Then in separate saucepans, cover the peeled chestnuts and baby onions with chicken stock, some thyme and a small knob of the butter. Season and bring both pans to the boil over a medium heat. Remove the chestnuts from the heat immediately and set this pan aside, but continue to cook the onions for 1 minute or so, until soft, then allow to cool in the stock also. In a frying pan, shallow-fry the bacon lardons in the olive oil over a high heat until crisp.
  8. Drain off most of the chicken stock from the onions and chestnuts, add a further knob of the butter to each pan and warm over a low heat. Once warmed, add the brussels sprouts, if using, and bacon lardons to the chestnuts. Season to taste. Gently warm the celeriac purée.
  9. To serve, reheat the sauce. Place the hot lamb shanks into deep individual serving bowls and spoon a neat mound of celeriac purée alongside. Then add the cooked peas and broad beans, if using, to the hot sauce and spoon over the shanks, followed by the chestnuts and onions.
Tags:
restaurant
chef
high end
cuisine
Botanical
complex
challenging
fine dining
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