Yoghurt gelato

Yoghurt gelato

By
From
Gelato Messina
Makes
1 kg
Photographer
Billy Law

Like the other recipes in this book, I have given both a domestic and a professional method for making yoghurt gelato, but because their methods are quite different, I have listed them as two separate recipes. Both the domestic and professional methods yield great results, but note that if you use the professional method you will need a liquid yoghurt program on your pasteuriser.

Domestic: For this recipe, the Fior di Latte base is blended with ready-made natural yoghurt. When buying the yoghurt, look for the words ‘natural yoghurt’ on the label. Avoid yoghurts that are flavoured or have added sugar or stabilisers.

Professional: This is a two-step recipe. First you need to make a batch of liquid yoghurt, which is then used to replace the milk in the Fior di Latte recipe. I haven’t given specific quantities for the liquid yoghurt recipe, as the amount you make will depend on the size of your pasteuriser.

Domestic

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
250g milk
120g cream
145g sugar
45g skim milk powder
35g dextrose
5g stabiliser
400g natural yoghurt

Method

  1. Mixing

    Put the milk and cream in a double boiler over a medium heat.
  2. Put all the powders in a bowl and mix until combined. When the milk and cream hit 40°C, whisk in the powders and bring the mixture up to 65°C. Keep the mixture at 65°C for 30 minutes, whisking every 5 minutes.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a stainless steel bowl and place in an ice bath; chill to 40°C. Cover tightly with foil and put in the freezer, stirring every 10 minutes or so until the mixture drops to 4°C. Blend the yoghurt into the mixture using a stick blender, then place in the fridge and let it age for 4 hours.

    (You will notice that we didn’t heat the liquid yoghurt and cream during the mixing stage. Heating the yoghurt would destroy all the probiotic bacteria; your yoghurt gelato would resemble yoghurt but wouldn’t have the health benefits of real yoghurt.)
  4. Churning

    Turn on your gelato maker so it begins the freezing process.
  5. Using a stick blender, blend the mixture for 1 minute, then pour into the gelato maker. Once the mixture reaches –4°C, scoop out the gelato and transfer to a pre-cooled stainless steel bowl, cover tightly and immediately place in the freezer.
  6. Serving

    The gelato should be served within 2 to 3 hours after placing it in the freezer, or when it reaches –12°C. If it goes below –15°C or is left in the freezer overnight, the texture will be compromised.

Professional

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
650g liquid yoghurt
145g sugar
45g skim milk powder
35g dextrose
5g stabiliser, (see notes)
120g cream

Method

  1. Making the liquid yoghurt

    Clean and sanitise all equipment and utensils that will come into contact with the milk. Ensure you use the freshest milk possible.
  2. Pour the milk into the pasteuriser and select the yoghurt cycle. The pasteuriser will heat the milk to 95°C, then will instantly start its cooling cycle until it drops the temperature of the milk to 43°C. At 43°C, add a few grams of probiotic bacteria and whisk it into the milk to begin the inoculation phase.
  3. The machine will keep the milk at 43°C for 5 hours, allowing the bacteria to multiply and turn your milk into liquid yoghurt. You can extend this time to a maximum of 10 hours to give a more intense yoghurt flavour. Once the inoculation period is finished, the pasteuriser will recommence its cooling cycle and cool the liquid yoghurt to 4°C.
  4. (It’s important to understand why we use very fresh milk and why we heat it up to 95°C in the first phase before inoculation. We know from our previous discussion on the pasteurisation cycle what happens to any bacteria in milk when at temperatures of about 20°C to 50°C — they multiply rapidly. Therefore, we need to heat the milk to 95°C in a sterilised environment so there is little chance of bacteria surviving. If we don’t kill all the nasty bacteria before adding the probiotics, these bad bacteria will multiply along with the good bacteria and will contaminate your yoghurt gelato.)
  5. Mixing

    Once the pasteuriser begins the cooling phase, put all the powders in a bowl and dry mix. Whisk the powders into the liquid yoghurt. The pasteuriser will continue to cool the yoghurt mixture. When it gets down to 4°C, add the cream.
  6. (You will notice that we didn’t heat the liquid yoghurt and cream during the mixing stage. Heating the yoghurt would destroy all the probiotic bacteria; your yoghurt gelato would resemble yoghurt but wouldn’t have the health benefits of real yoghurt.)
  7. Churning

    Measure an appropriate amount of mixture into a measuring jug and put in a batch freezer. Within 10 to 12 minutes, your mixture should be ready for extraction.
  8. For long-term storage, up to 2 weeks: Put the gelato in a blast freezer for 30 minutes, then store at –18°C. For short-term storage, 2 to 3 days: Put in a storage freezer at –18°C.
  9. Serving

    The serving temperature of the gelato should be around –11°C to –13°C.

Notes (Professional)

  • You will need to adjust your gelato ingredient ratios depending on how much liquid yoghurt you make.

    For this recipe you need to use a stabiliser specifically designed to work in cold temperatures. Guar gum is probably best, although if you are making large batches, use a blended stabiliser of guar and xanthan, as the xanthan will help protect the gelato from the acid present in the yoghurt.

Tags:
gelato
ice cream
ice-cream
icecream
Gelato
Messina
Nick
Palumbo
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