Country terrine

Country terrine

By
From
The Margaret Fulton Cookbook
Serves
8
Photographer
Geoff Lung

Anyone who has been to France will remember with nostalgia the magnificent pâtés and terrines. One can choose from an enormous selection of these meats for a simple lunch, eaten with the incomparable crusty batons and a glass of wine. These meats are commonly made at home in France, each household having its own recipe, which is often called pâté maison.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
250g pork fat
500g pork belly
500g veal neck
1/4 cup each port and brandy
1 teaspoon thyme leaves, chopped
1 teaspoon fresh rosemary leaves, chopped
15g butter
1 small onion, finely chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled
500g chicken livers
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 teaspoon salt
freshly ground black pepper
100g pistachio nuts, blanched and peeled
a few sprigs thyme

Method

  1. Slice some of the pork fat thinly and use to line a terrine mould, saving some for the top. Dice the remaining fat and half the pork belly. Dice half the veal. Marinate the diced meats together with the port, brandy and herbs for several hours.
  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a small frying pan and cook the onion and garlic very gently for about 5 minutes until soft, without colouring. Cool this mixture. Cut the remaining veal and pork belly into pieces and mince, using a food processor. Remove and set aside. Remove any sinew from the chicken livers, place in the processor and mince. Preheat the oven to 140°C.
  3. In a bowl, combine the minced meats with the minced livers, egg, diced meats with marinade, salt and a good grinding of black pepper. Fold the pistachio nuts through the mixture. Turn into the prepared terrine mould and top with the reserved slice of pork fat and thyme. Cover with a lid and place the terrine in a baking dish half-filled with hot water. Bake for 1 1/4 hours. Remove from the oven, take off the lid and place a light weight on top. This is for easier slicing. Leave for 2 days before eating to allow the flavours to develop. Cut into thick slices and serve with crusty bread and cornichons.

Note:

  • some cooks use what is called a luting paste, a mixture of plain flour and water to make a soft dough which is put around the edge of the lid to seal between the lid and the mould. It bakes into a crust and protects the terrine from too much shrinkage.
Tags:
The Margaret Fulton Cookbook
Margaret
Fulton
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