Piroshki

Piroshki

By
From
The Margaret Fulton Cookbook
Makes
45-50 appetize-size piroshki. For picnics, barbecues or family eating, count on 30 larger ones.
Photographer
Geoff Lung

These can be made, lightly baked, cooled and frozen then taken out when needed. It just wouldn't be a party or celebration at my house if these hot savoury yeast breads were not served.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
3 cups plain flour
2 teaspoons salt
7g dry yeast
1 1/4 cups milk
125g butter
2 tablespoons sugar
1 egg yolk
beaten egg, to glaze

Filling:

Quantity Ingredient
3 large onions
60g butter
250g speck
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Method

  1. Sift the flour with the salt into a large mixing bowl. Stir in the dry yeast. Place the milk, butter and sugar in a saucepan. Heat gently until lukewarm and the butter has melted. Make a well in the centre of the flour and pour in the milk mixture and egg yolk. Stir, gradually incorporating the flour. Beat the dough with a wooden spoon, or your hand, for 3 minutes, until smooth and elastic. Sprinkle a little flour on top and cover with cling wrap, then a cloth. Leave in a warm place for about 1 hour, until the dough has doubled in bulk.
  2. Meanwhile make the filling. Chop the onions and fry slowly in the butter until golden, cool. Chop the speck very finely and mix with the onion and pepper. Preheat the oven to 230°C.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a floured board, knead lightly, and take a tablespoon-sized piece of dough. Flatten slightly into a thick disc and place a teaspoon of filling on top. Fold the edge over to enclose the filling and mould into a small ball. Place on a lightly greased baking tray. Repeat with remaining dough and filling and leave in a warm place to prove for 15 minutes. Brush with the beaten egg and bake for 10–15 minutes, until golden and cooked.
  4. To freeze: Pack in oven bags in serving-size lots. It is a simple matter to lift them out of the freezer and pop them straight into a moderate oven for about 10 minutes to reheat.

Note

  • Speck, a cured and smoked bacon, can be found at most good delicatessens. If unavailable, smoked streaky bacon is a good substitute.
Tags:
The Margaret Fulton Cookbook
Margaret
Fulton
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