Steamed fish coriander

Steamed fish coriander

By
From
Margaret Fulton Favourites
Serves
6
Photographer
Tanya Zouev and Armelle Habib

On my first trip to China in 1976 I visited Mao’s birthplace. We were taken to communes to see how Chinese people lived, ate, dressed and were schooled. I had been told before I left not to expect great food as the Chinese ate very simply. In fact, as I discovered, they ate very well. On a visit to one commune we were shown a lake where fish swam. The cadre gave the signal for fish to be caught and in what seemed like minutes we were sitting down to beautiful fish smothered with the finest aromatic vegetables. The Chinese are masters at cooking fish and balancing the seasonings, as this dish shows.

The fish is steamed almost to the point of being cooked, and then placed on a warm platter and seasoned. Hot, smoking oil is poured over just before it is taken to the table, which finishes the cooking and makes the flavour of the aromatic herbs and vegetables permeate the fish. The garnish of shredded spring onions, coriander and ginger is fantastic!

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 whole fish such as jewfish, snapper, barramundi or coral trout, scaled and cleaned
salt
3 spring onions, sliced
4 slices fresh ginger
1/2 bunch fresh coriander roots and stems
1 cup water

Garnish

Quantity Ingredient
4 spring onions, finely shredded
6 slices fresh ginger, finely shredded
1/2 cup fresh coriander leaves
2 tablespoons peanut or rice bran oil
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon light soy sauce

Method

  1. Score the fish with three diagonal cuts on each side of the thickest part and lightly salt inside and out. Place half the spring onions, ginger and coriander roots and stems in the cavity of the fish. Lay the remaining onions, ginger and coriander on a rack in the bottom of a flameproof dish to form a bed for the fish. Put the fish on top and add the water. Cover with foil or a lid and cook gently, for 10–15 minutes. You will know if the fish is cooked by the eyes, which should be white when it is done. To be sure, use a sharp pointed knife to make a small cut along a section of the backbone to see if the flesh lifts easily away from the bone.
  2. Place the fish on a heated serving dish and garnish with the shredded spring onions, ginger and coriander leaves. Heat the peanut and sesame oils in a small pan, then pour over the fish (if the oil is hot enough there should be lots of sizzling). Sprinkle with soy sauce and serve immediately with steamed rice.
Tags:
Margaret
Fulton
Favourites
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again