Verjuice

Verjuice

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

The word ‘verjuice’ comes from the French for green juice, vert jus. This gentle acidulant is made from green, unripe grapes or other sour fruits such as crabapples. Verjuice, or, to the Italians, agresto, was a common flavouring in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, when it was used as we would use lemon juice or vinegar today, to add sharpness to the flavour of food.

Verjuice is excellent used for deglazing a pan to make a sauce. Remove any excess fat from the pan in which meat or vegetables have been roasted or fried, leaving just a little. Add 250 ml verjuice and place over moderate heat. Scrape up the crusty bits, incorporating them into the verjuice. Reduce until jus is just beginning to coat the spoon. Add a knob of butter for richness and shine and strain into a jug or spoon over the food. Use verjuice in place of vinegar in salad dressings and marinades, and splash a little over cooked vegetables to give them a special tang.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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