Mutton

Mutton

By
From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

The meat of mature sheep over 2 years of age. Good mutton is brick-red when freshly cut and the bones are dry and white. Although not nearly as tender as lamb, many people prefer mutton’s richer flavour. Mutton is usually less expensive than lamb although it can be hard to find in butchers’ shops – low demand means low supply.

To cook: Mutton can be used in any recipe for pot-roasted, casseroled, ‘boiled’ or stewed lamb. It simply takes longer to cook. The choicest chump, loin chops or cutlets from a top-quality mutton carcase can be pan-fried or grilled (broiled) like lamb, although they will be less tender. (See Lamb.)

To roast mutton, use the slow method, in a preheated moderate oven throughout. No fat is needed in the pan. Mutton is best well-cooked – allow 40–45 minutes per 500 g. A sliced onion placed on meat before cooking gives it a delicious flavour.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

Tags:
Back to top
    No results found
    No more results
      No results found
      No more results
        No results found
        No more results
          No results found
          No more results
            No results found
            No more results
              No results found
              No more results
              Please start typing to begin your search
              We're sorry but we had trouble running your search. Please try again