Muffins, English

Muffins, English

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From
Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery

These flat, round, unsweetened yeast cakes were sold for many years in the streets of London and other English towns by the muffin man, with his tray and bell. Now they are available, packaged, at most supermarkets. Muffins are one of the great traditions of the English tea. They should be pulled apart (not cut), toasted, buttered and served hot.

They are useful, too, as a base for almost any topping, sweet or savoury. Perhaps their finest hour is as the base for Eggs Benedict (below), invented at Brennan’s Restaurant in New Orleans, USA, as part of the famous ‘Breakfast at Brennan’s’, a leisurely feast which may last most of the day.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
see method for ingredients

Method

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