Yeasted layered doughs

Yeasted layered doughs

By
Leiths School of Food and Wine
Contains
12 recipes
Published by
Quadrille Publishing
ISBN
978 184949 548 6
Photographer
Peter Cassidy

Here the skills of bread making and layered pastries come together to create tender, flaky pastries. The dough is rolled and folded with butter into hundreds of thin layers which then rise and separate – helped by the yeast in the dough and the heat of the oven.

We use a croissant base dough for all the pastries in this chapter, so by learning one technique you will be able to go on and bake a whole array of delicious pastries. The dough is incredibly versatile once mastered. Once you’ve savoured the smell of French pastries and croissants baking in your own home you’ll be making them for a special treat time and again. They give a tremendous sense of satisfaction.

Shaping cinnamon wheels

Using a large knife, trim the dough to a large rectangle. Spread the cinnamon butter over the rolled out pastry, leaving a 1cm border around the edge. Roll from the narrow end into a thick roll, sealing the end with a little egg glaze. Chill, covered, if the pastry is very soft to firm up, then trim off the edges and cut into 2–3cm slices. Turn cut side up and flatten them a little using your fingers.

Shaping almond squares

Cut the pastry into 12–15cm squares. Place 1 tsp frangipane in the centre of each square and fold each of the corners over so each tip sits on top of the frangipane. Press down slightly to seal the corners together.

Shaping pinwheels

Cut the pastry into 12–15cm squares. From each corner of each square make a cut towards the centre about 3cm long.

Place 1 tsp frangipane in the uncut centre of each square. Take one of the points of the pastry, fold it into the middle and press onto the frangipane to secure.

Continue to fold alternate points of pastry (one from each corner) into the middle and press to secure. This leaves one unfolded point at each corner and the pastry should now resemble a pinwheel.

Shaping combs

Cut the pastry into 10cm squares and place a line of either frangipane or cinnamon butter along the middle of each square. Brush the furthest edge with egg glaze, then fold the bottom half up over the filling to meet the other half squarely. Press the edges to seal; the sealed area should be at least 1.5–2cm wide.

Cut through the sealed edge of the dough only as far as the start of the filling, at 1cm intervals.

Carefully bend the filled side inwards into a crescent shape, causing the comb teeth to spread a little.

Shaping diamonds

Cut the pastry into 12–15cm squares, then 1cm in from the edge across opposing corners, cut through the pastry almost to the next corner on both sides.

Place 1 tsp frangipane or cinnamon butter in the centre of the pastry and lift the outer cut border over the filling to sit on top of the opposing inner corner.

Now lift the opposite outer cut border over the filling to sit on top of the opposing inner corner.

Featured Recipes in this Chapter

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