Bora and podina

Bora and podina

By
From
The Curry Guy
Makes
Enough for 4 as a snack

You won’t find bora and podina on many curry-house menus but I think they’re missing a trick. This is Bangladeshi snack food and an excellent alternative to papadams. It does take a little longer to make but it’s worth every extra minute.

This recipe was emailed to me by Eshan ‘Mo’ Miah. Mo and I have never met face to face but I feel like we’re great friends. Back in the early days of my blog, Mo started sending me his family recipes as well as recipes from his family’s restaurant, Table Talk, which is local to me. At the time, Mo was living and working near London but he arranged for me to visit the Table Talk kitchen to learn from his father, Manik Miah. I picked up so many tips and recipes that day.

Mo has been a great source for recipes, a few of which you’ll find in this book. He recently opened a new restaurant in Newquay called Zaman’s. If it is anywhere near as good as Table Talk, he’s on to a winner!

For the bora

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
100g masoor dhal (orange lentils)
1/2 onion, finely chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
380g rice flour
rapeseed oil, for deep-frying

For the podina

Quantity Ingredient
1/2 bunch fresh mint
1/2 bunch fresh coriander
10-15 fresh green chillies, to taste
420g plain yoghurt
salt

Method

  1. For the podina, put the mint, coriander, chillies and 2 tbsp water in a blender and blitz to a paste. Add this to the yoghurt in a bowl and mix until smooth, adding salt to taste. Refrigerate until really cold.
  2. For the bora, wash the lentils and soak them in cold water for 30 minutes. Drain and transfer to a saucepan. Add 550ml fresh water, the onion, salt and turmeric. Cook over a medium heat until the lentils are soft and the water is almost all gone.
  3. Tip the lentils into a bowl and stir in the rice flour. Mix thoroughly with your hands until you have a smooth dough (mixing everything while still warm makes it easier).
  4. On a flat surface, roll out the dough to a 2–3mm thickness (separate the dough into smaller balls to make this easier if you like). Cut out bite-sized pieces of the dough, either in long triangles or use cookie cutters to make different shapes.
  5. Heat at least 10cm (4 in) of rapeseed oil in a heavy-based pan for deep frying. When a piece of dough sizzles immediately when dropped into the oil, about 170°C, you’re ready to cook. Fry in batches, transfer to a plate lined with kitchen paper and keep warm while you deep-fry the rest. Season with a little more salt to taste if you like. They are ideally served piping hot with the fridge-cold podina.
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