Green tea dressing, shoots and fungi

Green tea dressing, shoots and fungi

By
From
Green Pickled Peaches
Serves
4
Photographer
Chris Chen

In recalling the customs and activities surrounding festivals, I am trying to understand what might signify ‘celebration’. I feel it’s a celebration to share a specially created dish with others, and this doesn’t necessarily require a festival that designates the food as culturally and symbolically important. For some reason, I keep coming back to a very humble dish of selected mixed vegetables.

For the green tea dressing

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
250ml light chicken s tock
20g ikan bilis, roasted
10g jade tie guanyin tea leaves, pulverised to powder
20g watercress leaves
20g chrysanthemum leaves
30g roasted peanuts
30g white sesame seeds, toasted
1 ablespoon mirin

For the glazed bamboo shoot

Quantity Ingredient
1 whole bamboo shoot
50g sugar
100ml light soy sauce
50ml dry sherry

For the mung bean noodles

Quantity Ingredient
30g mung bean s tarch
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon rice vinegar

For the fungi

Quantity Ingredient
8 oyster mushrooms
2 tablespoons clarified butter
4 green asparagus spears
olive oil, for brushing
2 tablespoons dried mullet roe, finely shaved

Method

  1. Make the green tea dressing:
  2. Bring the chicken stock to the boil in a saucepan. Remove from the heat and add the ikan bilis. Leave to infuse for 30 minutes or so. Add the green tea and infuse for a further 30 minutes. Transfer to a blender and purée with the watercress and chrysanthemum leaves. Grind the peanuts and sesame seeds together and then combine with the leaf purée. Pass through a fine sieve and season with the mirin and salt to taste.
  3. Glaze the bamboo shoot:
  4. Cut off the tough outer leaves of the bamboo shoot and trim away the tough end of the root. Place in a pot, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Simmer for 1 hour or until soft when tested with a skewer. Leave in the poaching liquid until cool enough to handle. Trim off any remaining tough leaves. Cut into quarters. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Combine the sugar and 25 ml water in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Add the soy sauce and sherry. Place the bamboo on a baking tray and pour the glazing liquid over it. Bake for 40 minutes until browned, basting with the liquid and turning the pieces once or twice for a more even glazing.
  5. Make the mung bean noodles:
  6. Mix the starch, salt and 270 ml water together in a stainless steel bowl. Place over a pan of simmering water and stir slowly with a wooden spoon. The mixture will slowly thicken and become translucent as it cooks. Once cooked, pass through a spaetzle plane set over iced water and let droplets fall into the water and set. Drain and dress the noodles with sesame oil and rice vinegar.
  7. Prepare the fungi:
  8. For the oyster mushrooms, heat a frying pan over very high heat, melt the butter and fry the mushrooms until they turn an appetising golden colour. Season with salt and white pepper and drain on paper towels. Trim the hard ends of the asparagus. Brush with some olive oil and fry on a plancha (metal griddle plate) until just cooked but still with a slightly charred appearance.
  9. Assemble the dish:
  10. Cut the bamboo into attractive cross-sections, allowing a few slices per person. Arrange on individual plates. Create a jumble of the vegetables and noodles on each plate and finish with shavings of the mullet roe and droplets of green tea dressing around and over everything.
Tags:
SBS
restaurant
Claude's
Chow's
Green
Pickled
Peaches
Chui
Lee
Luk
Malaysian
Asian
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