Lime and lemon marmalade

Lime and lemon marmalade

By
From
Citrus
Makes
4 x 450g jars
Photographer
Mowie Kay

Oh, how I loved Rose’s Lime Marmalade when I was a child. Decades later, I lived briefly in Dominica and discovered that for generations the island had provided Rose’s with the limes they needed for their marmalade and cordial. The child me would have been round-eyed at the thought I might one day visit anywhere quite so exotic – in those days we had limes in processed foods only, and very rarely saw one fresh.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
250g limes
125g lemons
900ml water
750g granulated sugar

Method

  1. Cut all the limes and lemons in half and juice them. Put the juice in a preserving pan or large saucepan with the water. Scrape the membranes out of the citrus fruit – the easiest way to do this is to cut the halves in half again, lay them flat, and cut through the pith and peel it away.
  2. Put the membranes and pulp in a piece of muslin or a jelly bag, secure firmly and put in the pan with the juice. Very finely slice the peel and add it to the pan. If you have time, cover and leave to stand overnight or for at least a few hours.
  3. When you are ready to make the marmalade, put the pan on the heat and bring to the boil. Keep it covered, turn down the heat and leave to simmer for around 2 hours until the peel has softened.
  4. Put the oven on at its lowest temperature. Put the sugar in a roasting tin and put in the oven to warm – this will help it dissolve faster, resulting in less foam and a clearer jelly.
  5. Remove the bag of membranes and pulp from the pan, after squeezing it against the side to extract as much juice as possible. Discard. Add the warmed sugar to the pan. Cook on a low heat, stirring until it has dissolved, then turn up the heat and allow the marmalade to boil until it reaches setting point – between 7 and 10 minutes.
  6. Remove from the heat. When the bubbling has subsided, remove any scum, then leave the marmalade to cool for around 10 minutes. Give it a good stir to evenly distribute the peel throughout the jelly, then decant into sterilised jars. Cover and leave to cool.

Note

  • The time your marmalade takes to reach setting point can vary depending on the levels of pectin in the fruit used. To test, chill a saucer or plate in the refrigerator, then spoon onto it a tablespoon of the boiled marmalade. Allow to cool a little, then run your finger across the surface of the marmalade. If it wrinkles then it has reached setting point; if not, then continue to boil and test again. If you have a jam or sugar thermometer, you’re looking for a temperature of 105°C.
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