Chapati/roti/phulka

Chapati/roti/phulka

By
From
I Love Curry
Makes
10, can be doubled
Photographer
Jonathan Gregson

These are all different names for the same basic, everyday wholewheat flatbreads. They are soft, puff up when cooked and, if you have a gas cooker, become a little crisp on the underside. Don’t worry about not rolling a perfect circle, practice makes perfect, just keep giving the bread quarter turns for an even thickness. You can find chapati (atta) flour in most large supermarkets but, if you can’t get hold of any, use equal quantities of wholewheat and plain flour instead. These can be made in advance and reheated, wrapped in foil, in a medium oven. I don’t season this bread as it is used to mop up well-seasoned sauces, but you can add salt if you like.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
300g chapati flour (or half wholewheat and half plain flour), plus more to dust
salt, (optional)
200-240ml water

Method

  1. Sift the flour and salt (if using) into a bowl and make a well in the centre. Slowly drizzle in most of the water and, using your hand, draw the flour into the centre, mixing all the time. You may not need all the water. The dough should be slightly sticky and will firm up as you knead it. Knead for eight to 10 minutes, or until it is elastic. Place in a bowl, cover with a damp tea towel and leave for 30 minutes in a warm area, or at room temperature in the summer.
  2. Divide the dough into 10 equal portions and roll into golf ball-sized pieces; cover again. Flour a work surface and rolling pin. Roll each ball into 12.5– 15cm circles. The best way to do this is to keep rolling in one direction, regularly giving the dough a quarter turn to get a round shape.
  3. Heat a tava or frying pan until hot. Toss the chapati from one hand to the other to remove excess flour, and place on the tava. Reduce the heat to moderate and cook until small bubbles appear on the underside, about 10–20 seconds, then flip. Cook this side until it has small dark beige spots.
  4. Now, using tongs, place the bread directly on the gas flame. It will puff up immediately and, 10 seconds later, dark spots will appear. Turn the bread with tongs, leave for a few seconds more, then wrap in foil and keep warm in a low oven while you make the rest.
  5. If you only have an electric cooker, press down gently on the cooked bread in the pan; as you press one area the rest should puff up. Then tackle the next bit. This way the bread should puff up all over.
Tags:
curry
India
Indian
Asian
I
Love
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