Spelt rotis

Spelt rotis

By
From
Eat Right For Your Body Type
Makes
4
Photographer
Lisa Linder

North Indians eat wholewheat flatbreads with most meals. These are yeast-free which suits vata, and spelt is lower in gluten than wheat, which is good for all doshas (gluten increases mucus). I use half wholewheat and half plain spelt flour as together they make softer breads, but use whichever you prefer. There is no real skill involved – you just need a rolling pin. Don’t worry about trying to make them into a perfect circle (although practice does make perfect) – make them whatever shape you like. Great for vata and pitta, also fine for kapha on the odd occasion.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
80g wholewheat spelt flour, plus extra for dusting
90ml water

Method

  1. Place the flour in a large bowl, add the water and, using your hands, mix the dough together. If you feel the dough is a little dry, add another teaspoon of water or so. Knead well for 4–5 minutes or until the dough is smooth – the resulting dough will be just slightly sticky. Place in a bowl, cover with a damp tea towel and leave for 20–30 minutes to rest.
  2. Divide the dough into four balls. Sprinkle your work surface with a little extra flour. Take a ball in your palms, make a round shape and then flatten it a little. Dip both sides in some extra flour and roll into a thin circle, 12.5–15 cm in diameter. The best way of doing this is to keep turning the dough a quarter circle as you roll.
  3. Heat a tava (Indian flat griddle pan) or non-stick frying pan until quite hot. Brush off excess flour and place the bread on the tava. Reduce heat to moderate and cook until small bubbles appear on the underside, about 20–30 seconds, then turn and cook until the base has small brown spots.
  4. At this stage you can turn the roti and cook on the underside again until brown spots appear, but if you have a gas hob, you can try to get them to puff up. Place the roti (undercooked side facing the flame) directly over the flame using tongs and it will start to puff up. Keep it moving, allowing the bread to rest on the flame for no more than a second. The whole process takes only 5–6 seconds. Place on a plate. If you have an electric hob, press down gently on different areas of the cooked bread in the pan – as you press one area, the rest should puff up, then tackle the next area. Keep the bread warm by wrapping in a napkin or foil and keep in a low oven while you make the rest.
Tags:
health
diet
ayurvedic
ayurveda
weightloss
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